Article archive for 2004 – Page 2

Saturday, May 1, 2004

Utilizing the IBM Trace Log in WebSphere Application Server

If you’ve done any work at all in server-side Java applications development, you’ve had some exposure to Jakarta Commons Logging, and one or more of the products that it supports such as Log4j or Java’s own native logging facilities that were introduced with version 1.4. However, before you go to all of the trouble involved in overriding IBM’s own logging implementation, you might first consider the value of simply using the default services that they have provided. This article provides powerful details on all the options.

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Monday, March 1, 2004

Use WebSphere to develop Java applications for Palm handhelds

Did you know you could use WebSphere to develop applications that’ll run on Palm OS handhelds? The combined Palm, Inc. and Handspring, now known by the very silly palmOne name, has announced general availability of an ARM-processor-optimized Java runtime for end users.

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Monday, March 1, 2004

WebSphere, grid computing, and China

China’s Ministry of Education has started using grid computing technology to hook up universities across that vast country, making it possible for vast networks of computers to work together on research, scientific, and education projects. IBM tells us that this is one of the world’s largest grid computing implementations, linking more than 200,000 students and faculty across more than 100 universities. This important article explains what that all means.

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Monday, March 1, 2004

Raise the Red Flag: WebSphere goes to China

Technology sometimes makes for strange bedfellows. Such is most definitely the case when you look at IBM’s new support for the WebSphere platform on Red Flag Linux. In this important article, Editor-in-Chief David Gewirtz looks at the issues involved in this new form of globalization.

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Monday, March 1, 2004

Creating a MySQL data source using WebSphere Application Server

Recently, we ran an article on how to connect to the popular open source database MySQL from WebSphere Studio Application Developer. Once you’ve created your application using MySQL, though, you’ll want to deploy it to an application server, presumably WebSphere Application Server. To use MySQL on the application server, you will need to create a JDBC data source if you want to take advantage of the connection pooling capabilities inherent in the WebSphere platform. This article by Contributing Editor Jeff Chilton will show you how.

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Sunday, February 1, 2004

A simple introduction to J2EE

This week, we’re beginning a series of articles that’ll run every few weeks about the basics of WebSphere. We’re finding more and more readers interested in WebSphere, but still somewhat confused what it really does and is. Because the WebSphere Application Server supports J2EE, we’re going to start off by providing a short intro to J2EE.

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Sunday, February 1, 2004

10 great sites for WebSphere professionals

Every day, we meet more and more interesting folks working in the WebSphere community. This week, we thought we’d take a few minutes to give you a tour of some of the more useful resources you can take advantage of.

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Sunday, February 1, 2004

Mapping properties in WebSphere Commerce Suite

This week, we’ve got a great tip for those of you using WebSphere Commerce Suite, and who want have independent access to your own property file.

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Sunday, February 1, 2004

Are you a hotshot or not?

Do you have a knack for explaining tough concepts in an easygoing manner? Do you want access to the insiders, the newest products, and the juiciest trends? Do you like getting free goodies and then finding all the nooks and crannies of what makes them work? If so, consider writing for WebSpherePower Magazine. This article tells you how to get started.

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Sunday, February 1, 2004

Accessing remote AS/400 databases using JTOpen

If you’re running a relatively complex Web site, at some point you’re going to need to perform remote queries of databases running on remote machines. Over the past few weeks, we’ve gotten a number of requests about accessing AS/400-hosted databases from a WebSphere machine, remotely. This short article will point you to JTOpen and get you started.

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